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, who warned that u.s. military personnel and u.s. citizens in japan should actually go back to a radius of 80 kilometers around fukushima. japan has said 20 kilometers, so it seems that the u.s. has an assessment that is fairly serious. >> any idea if they are following the french lead, recommending that they leave japan altogether? >> we have not had any word on that from the united states government. i think that would be much further for the u.s. in the sense that the u.s. has so many people in the country, currently 50,000 u.s. troops currently in japan get there is concern. the u.s. government says it is monitoring -- currently in japan. there is concern. the u.s. government says it is monitoring the situation. there is no thought that anyone residing in the u.s. is at risk. >> but with 34 u.s. experts landing on wednesday, joining seven others, all with an american equipment, the u.s. is having to answer questions about whether it even trusts japan completely. >> a slight difference from what we are hearing out of japan and from the united states. i think it is worth pointing out
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
't use violence against his people. does it show how little leverage the u.s. has in yemen now? >> reporter: we are seeing more and more the past few weeks, it looks as though the u.s. has more leverage. we saw a comment from the president in the last few weeks saying the u.s. shouldn't meddle. foreigners shouldn't intervene in the affairs there. there was a call between john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security. he was there telling yemen president they were praising him for his initiative and make sure they protect the protesters there. they agreed to that. today, you are seeing a crackdown, again. this is worrying to the u.s. there should be dialogue in yemen. the president is saying there should be. but we are seeing more and more violence in the streets. >> joining us live from abu dabi. that you know for that. >>> a critical and dangerous situation is going on right now with two nuclear plants damaged by the massive quake in japan. to make a bad situation worse, an explosion at one of them today. we have the latest coming up. [ male announcer ] 95
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the opera
the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality. >> reporter: all of the uncertainty leading to more evacuation of locate from the immediate exclusion zone as well as from sendai the biggest city near the reactor complex. another evacuation center locals grumble over the perceived mishandling of t
indoors. the u.s. government says its residents within 50 miles should leave. >> we think it's a prudent measure to follow the evacuation based on how we would handle a situation like that in the united states. >> reporter: there are six reactors at the site. in unit 1 an explosion destroyed part of an outer building. in unit 2 there may have been an explosion rupturing the containment facility and possibly letting radioactive fuel escape. unit 3 was the target of today's water drops. it too had an explosion of the outer building and it also has exposed fuel rods. unit 4 was shut down for maintenance when the earthquake struck, but it became the subject of a controversy when the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission said its stored fuel rods were totally exposed. units 5 and 6, which are also out of service, may also have problems with their used fuel rods. experts say unit 3 is especially dangerous, because it has recycled fuel that contains plutonium, an even greater health threat than the uranium in the oar reactors. the first of that electricity, brian, will go to unit 2. un
, this time at reactor number 4. martha: the u.s. officials say the next 28-48 hours are critical in stopping and cooling down what's going on inside these reactors. if it doesn't happen, this area could be deadly for many years to come. good morning julian. tell me what the latest is from where you are. >> reporter: i think have much the efforts today to put cold water on the reactors has failed. the helicopters have only marginally put as much water as they wanted to on the reactors. it doesn't seem to be having a regular effect. all hopes rest with the crews trying to link up the electricity line back into the plant that will then allow them to restart the generators which automatically pump cold water onto these heated up reactors and bring temperatures down. all other efforts seem to have failed. the attempt to use fire engines to pump cold water on the reactors has failed. they are look at a single solution now. martha: it sounds like it's up to these people known as the fukushima 50, 180 workers rotating in and out of the plant to limit their own exposure to the radiation. what a coura
and the crash of a u.s. military jet in the east. and we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali, who denounced moammar qaddafi last month. >> ifill: then, margaret warner looks at rifts within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshou
is -- u.s. red cross is extending their hand. if the american people would like to help us please get in touch with those red cross and ngos and we are very gratified for that. >> thank you so much, mr. ambassador. we wish you luck in the days ahead. up next, a nuclear power expert gives us his take on fears of a partial meltdown in japan. ♪ punching that clock from dusk till dawn ♪ ♪ countin' the days till friday night ♪ ♪ that's when all the conditions are right for a good time ♪ [ male announcer ] advanced technology that helps provide cleaner air, cleaner water, and helps make all of us more energy efficient is something the whole world can get in step with. [ static ] ♪ i need a good time [ male announcer ] ecomagination from ge. it's technology that makes the world work. ♪ should i bundle all my policies with nationwide insurance ? watch this. on one hand, you have your home insurance with one company. and on another hand, you have your auto with another. and on another hand, you have your life with another. huh... but when you bundle them all together with natio
in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may have been too close for comfort for the libyan dictator. mark phillips is in tripoli. >> reporter: of all the targets that have been hit in these attacks, this flattened building in the qaddafi compound in tripoli is the one the qaddafi loyalists have complained about most. this is the attack they claim was launched to kill him. despite the hundreds of people who have gathered or been gathered around the complex to provide protection. >> families, children, men and women have come from everywhere to stay day and night to protect this location, to protect this location and the rocket hits only 52 to 100 meters away from them. >> reporter: qaddafi himself was probably not in his tent. he hasn't been seen since before the bombing began. his location a se
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
, tsunami warnings for at least 20 countries. and hawaii and the west coast of the u.s. under warnings as well. let me tell you about this quake. a devastating one, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded. it was an 8.9 magnitude quake. it hit off the coast of japan overnight. there have been several powerful aftershocks being felt, up to 7.0 in magnitude. the quake was centered 300 miles from tokyo, but it was felt in tokyo. buildings swayed. take a look at these pictures. our bureau there in tokyo as well. some of our co-workers being thrown around at times as well. this is just one of the views inside. people poured out onto the streets afterwards. they say it's a city in chaos right now. the danger we have now, the concern, a tsunami. it did trigger a tsunami, massive waves, some as high as 30 feet, starting to come ashore in places. this wall of water is starting to bring with it -- it's washing away cars, boats, buildings. looks like lava almost making its way through. here's the most stunning picture. waves of mud and debris can be seen like lava flowing through some
's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. ouan yd'lt fi y indin the people at toyota, al
in the u.s. america gets about 20% of its electricity from nuclear power. but the president says all energy sources have their down sides. >> nothing's completely failsafe. nothing's completely foolproof. and so, each time these kinds of events happen, i think it's very important for us to examine how we can further improve the safety and performance of these plants. >> president obama says he's been assured that hawaii and the u.s. mainland will not be affected by radiation from the japanese disaster. >>> so, what is the actual risk from the radiation leak in japan? dr. jon lapook has that part of the story. >> reporter: when radiation began leaking from the stricken power plant, the fallout was felt more than 5,000 miles away. at this pharmacy near los angeles. all sold out of potassium iodide. >> there's people that are really worried they're going from store to store. >> reporter: the pills can prevent the thyroid from developing cancer caused by radiation. but are they really necessary here? >> i think that's extremely unlikely that there will be any risk to folks in this country. i me
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
. still, u.s. warships and planes helping with relief efforts temporarily moved away from the area as a precaution. crews have been desperately trying to avoid a nuclear meltdown at the facility since it was damaged in friday's powerful earthquake. over the weekend they dumped sea water into the reactors to try to cool them down. more than 180,000 residents were also evacuated, and had to be scanned for radiation before entering shelters. across the northeast coast, more than 10,000 people are believed to be dead from the magnitude 9 quake, and tsunami. dramatic new video captured violent waves that slammed ashore, wiping out entire villages. since the massive earthquake three days ago, aftershocks continue to rattle the region. an average of 12 to 15 per hour. some more than 6.0 in magnitude. but there are stories of survival. crews rescued this 60-year-old man who was clinging to what was left of his roof. this man also made it out alive. i thought i was dying when i was pushed into the water, he says. but with thoughts of my family i decided to make every effort to survive. but
the president's plan. >>> fallout fears. the pentagon considers the mandatory evacuation of all u.s. military personnel threatened by radiation in japan as the first american victim of the tragedy is found. >>> and medical marvel. a texas man gets the first full facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" facial transplant in the u.s. this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, march 22nd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. this morning allied forces are working to expand the no fly zone over libya. overnight tripoli was targeted for the third day in a row and there is growing discord among the allies and here in this country over the u.s. role. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. >> reporter: several days of attacks on libya are having their intended effect according to u.s. officials, even so, more in congress are questioning the president's decisions. anti-aircraft fire erupted in tripoli overnight as moammar gadhafi's forces battled a fresh round of air strikes. u.s. officials say days of attacks on the regi
: at this point, 7 ships are headed to japan including the u.s.s. ronald reagan that has medical facilities as well as air lift capabilities to move people and supplies. the u.s. has 38,000 troops who were already stationed in japan. the defense department put out a video of marines ready to head to mainland japan with other assets. secretary gates says the military wants to do whatever is needed by the government of japan or by the government in tokyo. >> we have the ronald reagan closing in japan. we are sending another ship, we're pulling in helicopters from around the region, from okinawa and so on. so those ships can be used for helicopter operations in humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. >> molly: as far as american citizens in japan, so far the u.s. government has no reports of serious injuries or deaths. >> jamie: molly, the government is downplaying somewhat the risk of the radiation but search and rescue seems viable at this point. what teams other than we spoke will be going there. >> molly: they are serious experts. usig says two teams have been deployed to japan at the
for about 20 countries and includes the west coast of the u.s., hawaii, as well, alaska, as well. >> yeah, i understand, rob, we've been hearing there's a full coastal evacuation in effect in hawaii right now. and we get this sheet and i know you have it too of the coordinates and the estimated arrival time. what does that translate into in terms of waves and what people can expect? and really how much time they have to get out of harm's way? >> well, the pictures that we've been showing, those dramatic pictures where you see water and debris on all sorts of stuff moving rapidly inland, being pushed in like that and tens of miles inland, there was little warning. this is very close to the shoreline, and the epicenter was about 80 miles offshore. so the wave -- the tsunami after the quake happened hit that shoreline about 15 to 20 minutes later. virtually no warning at all. and you get the full force of that impact without any sort of buffer from the ocean. now, as this thing travels across the ocean in all directions down to the south up to the north off to the east, it does begin to lose it
%. bill: the mounting nuclear concerns forcing the u.s. military to reposition some ships and aircraft away from the east coast of japan. the u.s.s. ronald reagan now pulling back from the fukushima plant after low levels of radioactivity were found in the air. 17 air crew members who returned from a relief mission were said to have been exposed to low levels of radioactive activity. they were treated but they have not had any reaction. >> reporter: following the disaster in japan some say it's still a viable and vital source of energy in the u.s., but connecticut senator joe lieberman says it's time to put a brake on nuclear power. >> put the brakes on it until we understand the ramifications of what's happened in japan. we have 104 nuclear power plants in america now. 23 of them are built according to designs that are similar to the nuclear power plants in japan that are now the focus of our concern. >> reporter: senator lieberman says he still supports the development of nuclear power, but the u.s. should take another look at its domestic policy. bill: the facts on the fukushima nuc
are struggling to contain the threat of multiple meltdowns. flooding across large parts of the u.s. force some residents out of their homes and on to higher ground. and pushed out. the state department spokesman quits after causing the treatment of the suspected wikileaks leaker ridiculous. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. we are getting a clearer picture of the death and devastation in japan caused by friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. here's the latest. japan has now upgraded the quake to a magnitude 9. more than 1400 people are confirmed dead, with fears the toll could surge past 10,000. authorities say there is a risk of another nuclear reactor explosion, but u.s. officials say there is no radiation threat to the west coast. dent all along the we have correspondents all along the earthquake zone tonight and we begin with ben tracey in tokyo. >> reporter: the port town of minamisanriku on the northeastern coast is nearly wiped out and in the area near there authorities now fear 10,000 people may be dead. when
in the opening minutes of the day as the u.s. stock market reacts to the nuclear crisis. >>> i'm tamron hall. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 poi
, and the west coast. it appears the u.s. has escaped significant damage. we'll check in with meteorologist jeff ranieri in san francisco in a moment. first, joining me on the phone from tokyo is our producer, arata yamamoto. hello, arata. >> reporter: hi. >> there have been more than 100 aftershocks of a magnitude of five or greater, i believe. are you feeling these? >> reporter: some of them. not all. i am 188 miles south of the epicenter. ones i feel here are not as many as that. >> and are you seeing any further signs of damage where you are? >> reporter: not here in tokyo. i think the damage that was caused in tokyo, we heard reports of a walkway collapsing and we have reports of death here but that was from the first earthquake, not from the following aftershock. >> i believe the road system, as well, has been damaged in tokyoingtokyo i , a number of high ways closed, correct? >> reporter: the roads are closed. and what's compounded that is the fact that up until around midnight most of the train system was shut down which meant that everyone, people working in tokyo on a friday, busy frid
of power. >> as u.s. president obama outlines his position, delegates from dozens of country s arriie in london to discuss libya's future. >>> hello, 5:00 a.m. in washington, 10:00 a.m. in london. >> you're watching "world one live" from london. also ahead. >>> this is a pro-government rally, organized to show support for syria's president assad. >>> more trouble at the japan fukushima nuclear plant. a plutonium leak and tons of contaminated water are the latest hazards. >> good news out of denmark. watch this. >> yeah! >> yes! >> delight for police searching for a missing 3-year-old as news comes in that he's been found. >>> we begin with the crisis in libya and foreign ministers from more than 40 countries are meeting in london today to talk about how libya can move ahead without moammar gadhafi. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton's going to be there, so will the british prime minister david cameron and the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon. there will be a strong showing from the arab world with representatives from qatar, jordan, lebanon, iraq, morocco and tunisia. the talks
of this earthquake. it's not just the u.s., this is worldwide, because, as i said, japan is a very, very important economy. look at the japanese stock market. the nikkei, second day in a row of heavy losses. down 10.6% overnight. what typically happens, it starts in the east and moves west. hong kong, down only about 3%, though on a normal day, that's a big drop in the stock market. frankfurt, the dax, down 3.4%. the cac 40 in paris, down 2.3%. london's ftse 100, 1.3. you can see as we kent west, things started to calm down on markets. the bottom line in the united states is that japan is -- it's a big trading partner, but not as crucial as a lot of other countries like china, for instance. one of the things you'll see in the united states there will be some effect on supplies of electronics, technology equipment, computers and automobiles. the biggest export that japan has to the u.s. is automobiles. and a lot of them are auto parts. that's where you will see some of the biggest effect. as for japan itself, typically after a big disaster, you see some economic slowdown, then a build up because of
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
moammar gadhafi in power. hillary clinton represents the u.s. ban ki moon and more will attend. they called on gadhafi to leave libya. >>> the u.s. president made his case to fellow americans for intervening in libya's civil war. barack obama said the u.s. had a responsibility to act to the overt a civilian massacre but not to seek by force. libyan fighters very run into resistance. >>> disturbing news we're hearing about radiation levels at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. radioactive water may be leaking from a containment vessel. they've also found plutonium in the soil, but the levels, they say, are not harmful to humans. >>> pro-government demonstrations are expected in syria on tuesday. one of the latest places to have anti-government protests being held. "world business" starts now. >>> good morning, from cnn london, i'm nina del santos. >> and i'm pauline chu, and this is world business today. the top stories on this tuesday, march 29th. u.s. president barack obama tries to explain his country's intervention in libya, but his critics are counting the cost of t
to what we are seeing in japan. thanks again. >> thank you. >> the u.s. gets roughly 20% of energy from nuclear power and there have been calls from both sides of the isaisle to increas the number. in the wake of the disaster chuck todd asked chuck schumer if he's rethinking that position. >> we're going to have to see what happens here obviously. it's still -- still things are happening, but the bottom line is we do have to free ourselves of independence from foreign oil and the other half of the globe. libya showed that. prices are up. our economy is hurt by it or could be hurt by it. i'm willing to look at nuclear. it has to be done safely and carefully. >> let's bring in nbc news white house correspondent mike viqueira. where does the energy debate stand as we move into the new work week in washington, d.c., especially based on what we are seeing coming out of japan? >> reporter: it's interesting. it's a matter of energy policy and politics as well. it was just a day before yesterday, thomas, when the president of the united states at a press conference friday here at the executive
into their cause. that is half of their active force. the united states involved in a big way, as well. the u.s.a. ronald -- u.s.s. ronald reagan and 20 rescue missions were run and choppers from there. six were in operation, rescue operations. you name it. at the end, it all comes to down to the japanese people. again in small coastal town we watched you might see a boat behind me. there were boats, there were trucks, there were cars lining the streets upside-down swept by the tsunami which had hit here on friday. most of those were taken away by the end of the day, very determined people, indeed. >> gregg: earthquake in japan hitting very close to home. many japanese-americans trying to get in touch with their loved ones. one community on the west coast springing into action to help victims. casey stegall is live in little tokyo section of los angeles. >> reporter: a lot of people don't know this but 300,000 japanese-americans call the state of california home. that is the largest population in all of the united states. little tokyo, a neighborhood back here behind me in downtown los angeles,
of the spent fuel tank pools at the fukushima nuclear plant to our north, so says the head of the u.s. regulatory agency which reports it has experts at that plant right now. what does that mean? it means there is nothing to keep those fuel rods from overheating and potentially melting down. in fact, earlier this morning the international atomic energy agency confirmed partial meltdown at not one but three reactors here. experts tell us they belief this video may show radioactive steam coming off that spent fuel pool. the u.s. agency reports radiation levels are extremely high and that could effect efforts to cool down those rods. let's get right to team fox coverage of the disaster here in japan. in new york, los angeles, and at the white house, let's begin with greg palkot who is just outside tokyo at the airport. what's the latest at fukushima, greg? >> hey, shep. it's not been a good 24 hours for the folks grappling with this crisis. it started wednesday morning reactor number 3. a plume of smoke, spike in radiation, evacuation of workers there and the fear that the containment ve
. the u.s. and many other countries continue to advise their citizens against nonessential travel to this country. >> lester holt, thanks. >>> we have more now on the fears about the radiation leaking out of the damaged nuclear plant. a big part of the story, and the fear is the weather specifically, where and how the winds are blowing. these concerns are two fold. number one, surface winds, which could be very bad news in japan. number two, upper level winds coming across the pacific as they do every day toward the u.s. west coast. brian norcross is at the weather channel standing by with all of it, brian, good evening. >> first of all, the surface winds did switch as bob bazell said from the north today, that would be in the direction of tokyo. the good news is, it's going to switch quickly to come out of the northwest, that's going to push this plume offshore. really, the amounts of concentration that would move very far from the plant do not look to be a concern here at all. going on into the weekend, the pattern gets very light, and we don't think in that case that anything w
mass evacuations of their citizens from northeast japan. in the meantime, the u.s. and many other countries continue to advise their citizens against nonessential travel to this country, brian? >>> now more on the fears of the radiation leaking out of that damaged nuclear plant. a big part of the story, and the fear is the weather specifically, where and how the winds are blowing. the concerns are two-fold. surface winds, which could be very bad news locally in japan. and upper level winds, as they do every day, coming across the pacific toward the u.s. west coast. meteorologist bryan norcross at the weather channel standing by with all of it. bryan, good evening. >> good evening, brian. yes, the winds switched around to the north today, in the direction of tokyo. but they were light. that happened today, the good news is, the next couple days, winds are going to come in from the northwest. and anything that gets released from those plants is going to be blown offshore. late in the week, into the weekend the weather pattern changes and the winds become very light. it looks like at
>>> this morning on "early today," high alert. the u.s. authorizes american evacuations out of japan as nuclear meltdown concerns grow. >>> line of fire, security cameras capture a dramatic shoot-out at a tennessee convenience stor >>> and space odyssey, video unveils the international space >>> and space odyssey, video unveils the international space station's newest resident. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today, we begin with exit strategy. as japan's nuclear crisis deepens and reports about the status of one of its nuclear plants differ, the united states has authorized the first evacuation of mernsz out of japan. tracie potts joins us from washington with the latest on this. good morning. >> reporter: lynn, good morning. good morning, everybody. we learned overnight that these will be volunteer evacuations even though the airports have reopened, commercial flights are available, the u.s. state department will be organizing charter flights out of tokyo and other locations in japan to get americans out. the u.s. b
>>> how the u.s. is hoping to prevent a nuclear disaster in japan while not putting lives at risk. >> reporter: u.s. customs and border protection is specifically monitoring traffic from japan. we have a live report from sfo. >> reporter: and what happened today that could mean a better commute for commuters of the east bay. >>> we begin with the obama administration announcing that the radioactive zone leaving japan does not pose a risk for this area. these are the latest aerial images of the fukushima dai- ichi plant. they are continuing efforts to cool rods while a local power company is trying to restore electricity by cooling pumps. here's more. >> reporter: japanese officials say they will keep trying to cool reactor number 3 at the fukushima dai-ichi attempt even though little has been done. >> translator: in order to start the cooling, we've asked for water-drop operations and the spraying of water from the ground. >> reporter: engineers began looking at ways to get the power back on. officials hope the power is restored -- once the power is restored to the plant, the powe
no action on the nation's gridirons this fall. and quake questions-- this town prepared in the u.s. for an earthquake as strong as the one that hit japan. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. it is already sunday morning in japan, and another major aftershock has just hit the country which is still digging out after friday's disastrous 8.9-magnitude earthquake. here's the latest-- an explosion at a nuclear power plant forced 170,000 people to evacuate while an emergency was declared tonight at a second reactor in the same complex. roads and buildings throughout the area have been devastated, and hundreds of thousands are stranded without food or water. we have correspondents all along the earthquake zone tonight and we begin with ben tracy in tokyo. >> reporter: with more cameras on the ground, we are now getting our closest look yet at the extent of the damage. it is simply overwhelming. in hard-hit sendai, a city of one million people, police say they found as many as 300 bodies washed up on the beach as the
of reports, there is disagreement between the u.s.a. and japan over how dangerous the nuclear leak situation really is. the u.s. military has ordered military personnel to be 50 miles away from the leaking reactors. japan is an 18-mile warning zone. and the obama administration is sending private planes into japan to evacuate americans if they want to leave. now, in public, both governments say they are in synch with each other. some in the media dispute that. >> the obama administration and the government clearly isn't trusting what's come out of the japanese government and taking upon itself to warn american citizen what is to do in japan. >> the tokyo electric power company tepco is preaching calm that catastrophic radiation leak can be averted. but they have said that before. >> bill: that private concern is a tokyo electric power company or tepco, the fourth largest power company in the world. in 2002, five tepco executives were force god resign for falsifying nuclear plant safety records. in 2003, all 17 japanese nuke plants were shut down for a time because of false safety reports. in
in the u.s.? we'll have that. >>> and as international rescue teams scramble to help people in japan, we follow the efforts of the u.s. military to see for ourselves the problem they're up against right now. stay with cnn. the chief operatr at a national tissue bank when she decided to get her masters in healthcare administration. by choosing a university that connects working students to faculty who are also leaders in their fields... she was able to apply her studies to the real world... and help more people, much quicker. ♪ my name is diane wilson, i deliver the best gifts on earth, and i am a phoenix. [ male announcer ] learn more about the college of nursing at phoenix.edu. [ laughs ] not funny. act my age? -why? -why? -why? i love the sun. past sun goddess. every line has a story. [ female announcer ] we all age differently. now there's roc multi-correxion 4 zone moisturizer with roc®retinol and antioxidants. a lifetime of stress lines, sun damage, and worry wrinkles will fade in just 4 weeks. -crows feet... -belong on birds. [ female announcer ] roc multi-correxion. correct wha
and we'll keep in close contact with you, nic, as we find out more about these developments. >>> u.s. president barack obama indicated friday he will not be taking the lead in enforcing this no-fly zone. there were discussions about the complications enforcing it. >> how would the imposition of this no-fly zone work, strikes have to proceed sort of securing the airspace over libya? where would they come from? >> let's take a closer look. we have to be clear about that. the united states insisted there would be certain air participation. if you imagine this circle, then you're going to impose a no-fly zone over libya, one of the first step use want to take, these are libyan air installations across the country. one of the first steps that happens in a no-fly zone is you try to take out one of the runways. you bomb it from above so that libyan planes can't take off and run. they can repair those, but that's one key step to look for in the early days. take out especially the key northern areas. tripoli over here, oil and gas places over here. take out places that gadhafi and his people
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